How To Quit Your Job With Class

iStockphoto.com ( bobaa22 )

iStockphoto.com ( bobaa22 )

 

You've just accepted an offer for a job with a different company, and you're ready to kiss your current employer goodbye. In fact, given the choice, you'd call in sick for the next two weeks and never return.

 

First things first - you need to tell your current employer you're leaving.

What can you do to make your transition as smooth as possible without burning any bridges?

THINGS YOU SHOULD DO:

Give your notice in person to your manager. Assuming, of course, that this is possible - sometimes your manager works remotely, making this infeasible. But giving your notice face-to-face allows you to show the utmost respect.

• Be grateful. Thank your manager - profusely - for the opportunities they have given you. Even if you hate your job, show gratitude for what you gained.

• Tell your manager that the decision to leave was a difficult one. It takes a lot to leave a job behind, even a difficult job.

• Talk nicely about your employer and co-workers. Make clear that your employer runs a nice place to work, implying that you'd like to leave the door open in the future.

• Provide a written letter of resignation. HR will want this for the files, but even if they don't, it's a nice way to provide a written record of your gratitude for the opportunity.

• Give at least two weeks' notice. This will provide ample time to facilitate the transition of your function at work. It takes time for everybody to learn what you're working on and distribute what you've been handling.

• Be fair and balanced in your exit interview. The exit interview isn't an opportunity to unload every grievance you've been carrying around since the day you started; it's a chance for you to give objective feedback about what the company can truly do better. Choose what you say wisely - maintain a positive tone, and only bring up things that can be realistically changed. And pointing out all that stuff you don't like about your boss (and will never change) won't make you look good. I hate to say this, but filter what you say...

 

THINGS YOU SHOULD AVOID LIKE THE PLAGUE:

• Badmouthing your coworkers or boss. What will you gain, except some ill will from people you may run into again?

• Telling the company you'd entertain a counteroffer. Counteroffers are a difficult topic even when your employer brings it up. But when you solicit a counteroffer for the company to keep you, you look like a greedy jerk who went out and got another job offer so that you could hit up your current employer for more money. You'd look incredibly disloyal.

• Giving less than two weeks' notice. Unless there's a truly extenuating circumstance, give and honor two weeks. Otherwise you're leaving your employer high and dry.

• Taking all your vacation and sick days after giving your notice.  Why bother giving notice if you're not going to be around to help with the transition?

 


Scott Singer is the President and Founder of Insider Career Strategies Resume Writing & Career Coaching, a firm dedicated to guiding job seekers and companies through the job search and hiring process. Insider Career Strategies provides resume writing, LinkedIn profile development, and career coaching services, including a free resume review. You can email Scott Singer at scott.singer@insidercs.com, or via the website, www.insidercs.com.

Jump Start Your Career With A Professional Certification

iStockphoto.com ( SvetaZi )

iStockphoto.com ( SvetaZi )

 

If you're looking to move forward in your career, a certification can be a quick and cost effective way to sharpen your skills, improve your market value, and get some additional letters to place after your name on your LinkedIn profile and business card.

According to the U.S. Department of labor's CareerOneStop, "A certification is a credential that you earn to show that you have specific skills or knowledge. They are usually tied to an occupation, technology, or industry. Certifications are usually offered by a professional organization or a company that specializes in a particular field or technology."

Depending on the credential, the certification process can range anywhere from detailed and tedious, to a brief online course and test. It's faster than pursuing an additional college degree, and can often be done online per your own schedule. So, if you're looking to elevate your game, consider pursuing a certification to round out or solidify your credentials. Depending upon your specific field, here some certifications from which to choose. This list is by no means exhaustive.

PROJECT MANAGEMENT
Project Management Professional (PMP): The leading certification for project managers. It's not easy to get, but it's highly valued.
Certified Associate in Project Management (CAPM): Not as in-depth as the PMP, but also quite good.

HUMAN RESOURCES
Senior Certified Professional (SHRM-SCP) and Certified Professional (SHRM–CP): Designations denoting different levels of expertise as evaluated by the leading body in HR.
Senior Professional in Human Resources (SPHR) and Professional in Human Resources (PHR): Different certifying body (HRCI), similar credentials to SHRM-SCP and SHRM-CP.

MARKETING
American Marketing Association Professional Certified Marketer (PCM): Specializations in Digital Marketing, Content Marketing, and Marketing Management.

ENGINEERING
Professional Engineer (PE): The National Society of Professional Engineers offers this designation to demonstrate a higher level of competency in the field.

QUALITY
Six Sigma: There's a ton of certifying bodies for Yellow Belt, Green Belt, and Black Belt certifications. Supply chain, logistics, engineering, and business professionals can leverage a Six Sigma qualification to demonstrate an ability to use a methodical approach to solve problems and improve quality.
ASQ Certification: More of quality discipline oriented credential granted by a governing body.

WRITING & EDITING
Poynter ACES Certificate in Editing: If you have any interest in working in writing or publishing, this can help you elevate your game. Editing and proofreading have their own language and best practices.

This list is just a sampling. The information technology field, for example, has certifications for tons of technologies, security protocols, and systems. Even we resume writers and career coaches have our own credentials. Go online and do some research. Chances are your chosen field has credentials which can help you more forward in your career!


Scott Singer is the President and Founder of Insider Career Strategies Resume Writing & Career Coaching, a firm dedicated to guiding job seekers and companies through the job search and hiring process. Insider Career Strategies provides resume writing, LinkedIn profile development, and career coaching services, including a free resume review. You can email Scott Singer at scott.singer@insidercs.com, or via the website, www.insidercs.com.

3 Things You Don't Need To Do When Interviewing For A Job (But Would Probably Help!)

iStockphoto.com ( SIphotography )

iStockphoto.com ( SIphotography )

 

There are several "must-do" behaviors to follow when interviewing for a job. Dressing appropriately, showing up on time, and being polite come to mind.

And there are many things you don't need to do. Of course, none of the following are a substitute for skills and experience, but these can certainly help put your candidacy over the top.

  1. Smile. Yes, smile! In a full time job, you're spending 2,080 work hours per year with your boss and coworkers. Sure, you need to factor in overtime and deduct vacation days and holidays, but generally speaking, that's how many hours your manager and peers would spend alongside you. Smiling is a simple gesture which conveys friendliness, openness, and positivity, and often translates into likeability and may convince a hiring manager you're a good person to spend time with. Show those pearly whites.
     
  2. Bring extra copies of your resume. Human resources may have given your interviewers a copy of your resume, maybe not. Bring extra copies just in case - you'll look prepared and ready. Also, this is a good chance for you to present a version of your resume which you've tailored for this specific interview, rather than one which was pulled from the company's applicant tracking system.
     
  3. Send thank you notes to everyone you meet. This is a dying art; very few interviewees send these anymore. Sending a note (email is fine) will reinforce that the position for which you interviewed is front of mind, demonstrate your orientation toward action, and provide another touch point for you to sell yourself. I've seen well-placed notes push candidates over the top. It's an easy way to make a positive impression. Why waste the opportunity? Some interviewees feel like it's kissing up – it's not. It's both an act of courtesy and an opportunity to sell yourself.

Scott Singer is the President and Founder of Insider Career Strategies Resume Writing & Career Coaching, a firm dedicated to guiding job seekers and companies through the job search and hiring process. Insider Career Strategies provides resume writing, LinkedIn profile development, and career coaching services, including a free resume review. You can email Scott Singer at scott.singer@insidercs.com, or via the website, www.insidercs.com.