job hopping

How to Quit Your Job With Class

How to Quit Your Job With Class

You've just accepted an offer for a job with a different company, and you're ready to kiss your current employer goodbye. In fact, given the choice, you'd call in sick for the next two weeks and never return.

First things first - you need to tell your current employer you're leaving.

What can you do to make your transition as smooth as possible without burning any bridges?

THINGS YOU SHOULD DO:

Give your notice in person to your manager. Assuming, of course, that this is possible - sometimes your manager works remotely, making this infeasible. But giving your notice face-to-face allows you to show the utmost respect.

• Be grateful. Thank your manager - profusely - for the opportunities they have given you. Even if you hate your job, show gratitude for what you gained.

• Tell your manager that the decision to leave was a difficult one. It takes a lot to leave a job behind, even a difficult job.

• Talk nicely about your employer and co-workers. Make clear that your employer runs a nice place to work, implying that you'd like to leave the door open in the future.

• Provide a written letter of resignation. HR will want this for the files, but even if they don't, it's a nice way to provide a written record of your gratitude for the opportunity.

• Give at least two weeks' notice. This will provide ample time to facilitate the transition of your function at work. It takes time for everybody to learn what you're working on and distribute what you've been handling.

• Be fair and balanced in your exit interview. The exit interview isn't an opportunity to unload every grievance you've been carrying around since the day you started; it's a chance for you to give objective feedback about what the company can truly do better. Choose what you say wisely - maintain a positive tone, and only bring up things that can be realistically changed. And pointing out all that stuff you don't like about your boss (and will never change) won't make you look good. I hate to say this, but filter what you say...

 

THINGS YOU SHOULD AVOID LIKE THE PLAGUE:

• Badmouthing your coworkers or boss. What will you gain, except some ill will from people you may run into again?

• Telling the company you'd entertain a counteroffer. Counteroffers are a difficult topic even when your employer brings it up. But when you solicit a counteroffer for the company to keep you, you look like a greedy jerk who went out and got another job offer so that you could hit up your current employer for more money. You'd look incredibly disloyal.

• Giving less than two weeks' notice. Unless there's a truly extenuating circumstance, give and honor two weeks. Otherwise you're leaving your employer high and dry.

• Taking all your vacation and sick days after giving your notice.  Why bother giving notice if you're not going to be around to help with the transition?

 

Scott Singer is the President and Founder of Insider Career Strategies Resume Writing & Career Coaching, a firm dedicated to guiding job seekers and companies through the job search and hiring process. He is a Human Resources professional and staffing expert with almost two decades of in-house corporate HR and staffing firm experience, and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Professional Career Coach (CPCC).

Insider Career Strategies provides resume writing, LinkedIn profile development, and career coaching services, including a free resume review. You can email Scott Singer at scott.singer@insidercs.com, or via the website, www.insidercs.com.

 

The Risks of Being a Job Hopper

Job Hopper
Job Hopper

A job hopper is someone who changes jobs frequently. Every so often - whether it's a year or two, or six months - an employee finds a new company to call home. The individual just doesn't seem to stay put in a job very long.

The reasons an individual changes jobs more often than he flips his/her can mattress vary. The employee might change employers because:

  • She gets offered jobs for more money, and finds the allure irresistible
  • His performance suffers, and he's encouraged to move on
  • Caught in layoffs
  • Boredom sets in
  • She has an abrasive personality and wears out her welcome
  • He finds things about which to be dissatisfied

...and so on.

Truthfully, it doesn't really matter. Job hopping sets off a series of red flags with recruiters and interviewers.

"Job hopping, or moving around frequently, can be a complex situation to assess for both the individual and the potential employee," says Terri Osman, a Human Resources executive. "Some level of stability or trajectory to demonstrate impact in the role and to the organization as well as to professional development for the individual is important. Moving frequently during certain times of a career is not in and of itself a problem.  The key is the reasons for doing so."

You want to give the candidate the benefit of the doubt, especially if the candidate has an in-demand skill set. But employers do exercise caution with such candidates.

As a job seeker, this can cause problems. Employers may be less willing to invest the time and money into a candidate who is likely to leave in a short period of time, due to the organizational upheaval and financial hit which could result.

So, if you've job-hopped, how do you improve your chances of finding a good job?

  • Understand why you have changed jobs so frequently. Have a clear story to tell that doesn't raise an employer's alarm. Be forthcoming in walking an interviewer through the reasons for each move.
  • On a related note, be accountable for your job history. Don't tell interviewers that you had issues with this previous boss and the other...  You made certain career decisions, accept the consequences. It shows character when you own the actions you've taken.
  • Make the decision to stick it out for a while, even if a job is less than ideal. If you have a spotty record of enduring jobs, it might be to your benefit to obtain a few years with a single employer to demonstrate stability to future employers.
  • If your resume is scaring interviewers away, consider a more functionally-based format which highlights the skills you bring to the table.

Lastly, Osman gives the following advice: "I recommend to any individual that is considering a voluntary move to weigh the immediate benefit, implications, historical perspective and ability to justify. However, don’t force yourself to stay in a role where you cannot be at your best!"

Scott Singer is the President and Founder of Insider Career Strategies Resume Writing & Career Coaching, a firm dedicated to guiding job seekers and companies through the job search and hiring process. He is a Human Resources professional and staffing expert with almost two decades of in-house corporate HR and staffing firm experience, and is a Certified Professional Resume Writer (CPRW) and Certified Professional Career Coach (CPCC).

Insider Career Strategies provides resume writing, LinkedIn profile development, and career coaching services, including a free resume review. You can email Scott Singer at scott.singer@insidercs.com, or via the website, www.insidercs.com.